What Color Should I Paint My…?

January 11, 2013 § 2 Comments


January 11, 2013

More than ever, our homes are critically important to our sense of comfort and well-being where we build our own personal nests. The act of decorating our home is the catalyst that sparks our creativity, providing that special environment that helps us and those who live with us thrive.

Which is why it is not so simple to answer the question “What color should I paint my…?”

Image Via Colors For Your Every Mood

Image Via Colors For Your Every Mood

There are absolutely no quick or easy answers to that question. There isn’t a “magic bullet” answer as there are many factors to take into consideration, including:

Mood/Emotion

Lighting

Family

Lifestyle

Room scale/size

Likes/dislikes

My book Colors For Your Every Mood can help to guide you to some moods and color palettes as well as give you some of the color psychology behind those colors. Once you have familiarized yourself with color moods and you still feel you need some help to attain the “feel” you are comfortable with, you may want to hire a professional. At the very least, the book might help you to validate what you feel instinctively.

BrettRyderpicture

Before taking that final step and applying paint on the walls, it is important to think about the emotional aspect of color. The colors you choose will create moods and feelings that will have a great impact on you (and your family’s) well-being and comfort level.

You see, for someone to blindly suggest you paint any part of your home without them having a sense of who you are and what you hope to get out of the space, you are potentially asking for trouble. You wouldn’t want to end up with furniture that no longer matches or works in the space. These are costly mistakes that can be avoided.

Creating A Dynamic Work Space With Light And Color

September 12, 2012 § Leave a comment


September 12, 2012

I have answered many questions about color in my work. So many questions that I wrote the Color Answer Book to help to quell a lot of recurring themes. One specific question is how to create the illusion of more open space when working in a colorless cubicle with no windows.

This is the view from my desk. I am fortunate to have a home office where there is plenty of natural light which is crucial to color matching.

My answer is as follows.

Many employees complain about lackluster surroundings and how uninspiring they can be. The lack of natural light coming into a space can be so depressing, but color can certainly help to create specific illusions in our surroundings. First of all, bring some sunshine into the space by using some yellow, especially in the spot facing your desk. This can be in a painted surface such as the facing wall or, if it is not possible to repaint the wall, in a piece of art or a poster. Yellow is most closely associated in the human mind with sunshine and good cheer, and will make the space appear larger and lighter.

Isn’t this an inspiring office space? The lighting creates the sense of movement.

 Another method of opening up a cramped space is to use blue on the ceiling (suggestive of the sky), and if you can sponge on some white puffy clouds, all the better.

This may seem a bit extreme but new research is supporting the theory that “natural daylight is better for humans than the fluorescent bulbs most of us languish under for eight to 10 hours a day. Adding windows or simply improving artificial light in offices has been shown to increase productivity, boost morale and reduce the number of sick days, headaches and cases of eyestrain among workers.”

German applied-research group Fraunhofer is working on a balanced color spectrum of LED bulbs that will turn office ceilings into a lighting system that mimics the daylight sky with movement and changing hues.

Image Via

This technology might not be available in your office any time soon. In the meantime you can stick with my tips of bringing yellow into the space and if your boss will allow, paint the ceiling blue and don’t forget the clouds.

Do you work in a windowless office in a cubicle? How do you keep the doldrums away at your desk?

Click the link below for the full article.

Sky light sky bright – in the office – Research News January 2012 – Topic 1.

Eating A Fruit And Vegetable Rainbow Makes For A Rosy Glow

March 14, 2012 § Leave a comment


March 14, 2012

One question I get asked a lot is “Can the color of fruit and vegetables be an indicator of their healing powers?”

I have answered this and many more color questions in my Color Answer Book. Below is my response to this question and an excerpt from a study that has supporting evidence that further validates the research.

Ongoing research indicates that eating a variety of colorful fruits and vegetables can be extremely beneficial to our optimum health and healing. The color itself is an indicator of its curative powers. For example, eating red and purple fruits has been shown to help prevent heart disease and cancer. There are also non-irritating anti-inflammatory antioxidants in fruits such as cherries, raspberries, strawberries, cranberries, blueberries, blackberries, plums, and grapes. These delicious sources of well-being contain natural dyes called anthocyanins.

 

A new study that came out last week further supports these facts and raises them by stating that “The key to a rosy, healthy-looking complexion may be as simple as eating more fruits and vegetables, researchers say. Within a six-week period, fluctuation in fruit and vegetable consumption was associated with skin-color changes,” said lead researcher Ross Whitehead, from the School of Psychology at the University of St. Andrews in Scotland.


 

Now you know why your mother insisted you eat your fruits and vegetables!

Such A Tart!

January 12, 2012 § 2 Comments


January 12, 2012

Just as there are trends in fashion, technology and color there are also food trends. Whether it be in spices or the development of a new hybrid fruit or vegetable the epicurean world is growing and changing too. I am always intrigued with food trends and studies as I am a conscious consumer and take health and well being very seriously. I have written on the subject of color and food in my book: The Color Answer Book where I answer the question “can the color of fruit and vegetables be an indicator of their healing powers”?

Ongoing research indicates that eating a variety of colorful fruits and vegetables can be extremely beneficial to our optimum health and healing. The color itself is an indicator of its curative powers. For example, eating red and purple fruits has been shown to help prevent heart disease and cancer.

Take a look at what http://www.choosecherries.com/ has to say about cherries.

“Cherries are not only good for you, but they’re also on trend as a homegrown “Super Fruit.” According to recent data, more than 9 out of 10 Americans want to know where their food comes from, nearly 80 percent say they’re purchasing “locally produced” products, and the majority is defining “local” as grown in America. And cherries deliver.

A growing body of science reveals tart cherries, enjoyed as either dried, frozen cherries or cherry juice, have among the highest levels of disease-fighting antioxidants, when compared to other fruits. They also contain other important nutrients such as beta carotene (19 times more than blueberries or strawberries) vitamin C, potassium, magnesium, iron, fiber and folate.

Emerging evidence links cherries to many important health benefits – from helping to ease the pain of arthritis and gout, to reducing risk factors for heart disease, diabetes and certain cancers.”

So as your momma always told you to “eat your veggies”, let’s include the cherries, too.

Trends: Flavor Trends for 2012.

Green Is The New Green

February 11, 2011 § Leave a comment


February 11, 2011

I recently shared my love of the infographic and as such thought it fitting to share another one. Today’s graphic comes from Jerry Yudelson’s Presentation, Cool Water: Blue Is The New Green. It just felt right to do a blog about green since the promise of spring is right around the corner (according to Puxsutawney Phil). There are blossoms on the trees to substantiate that theory.

I found this interesting excerpt about green as quoted in Leatrice Eiseman’s Colors For Your Every Mood. Dr. Kurt Goldstein states in his book, The Organism (D.C. Health and Co., 1939):

“One could say red is inciting to activity and favorable for emotionally determined actions; green creates the condition of meditation and exact fulfillment of the task. Red may be suited to produce the emotional background out of which ideas and actions will emerge; in green these ideas will be developed and action executed.”

I really do love the Jolly Green Giant!

Food coloring: Do synthetic food colors cause hyperactivity?

January 3, 2011 § 2 Comments


January 3, 2011



We here at the eiseman color blog are very interested in all things related to color. Over the weekend, we found this story about food coloring that was fascinating. Lee has been sharing the ideas of Ben Feingold with her classes for years.

Years ago I heard that Red dye No5 was the worst (extreme word for effect) thing and it should be avoided at all cost. Then this weekend we picked up a book by Michael Pollen called Food Rules that shares some simple thoughts on food like not eating cereal that turns the milk colors. I like it, simple to understand.


The children will not be pleased with this one. Consider this informative color tidbit food for thought.

Click the link for more.

Food coloring: Do synthetic food colors cause hyperactivity? – chicagotribune.com.

Black Is The New Brown

December 27, 2010 § Leave a comment


December 27, 2010

For those of you who know me, you know that I am a devout pescatarian-no meat eater. Veggies, lentils, fungi, fruit, multigrain, fish, no sugar and non-fat (except for the good fat) diet.  I am always looking for healthy tips, especially those involving color, so when Whole Living magazine published and article claiming that Black is the New Brown, my ears and eyes, perked up!—Lee

Louisiana State University researchers have found that “Black rice may unseat brown as the healthiest option”.


“Like brown rice, black rice has an outer layer of antioxidant-rich bran, which has been shown to help lower cholesterol. Unlike the bran found in brown rice, however, black-rice bran contains anthocyanins, the purple and reddish pigments also found in blueberries, grapes, and acai. These compounds decrease the risk of heart disease and cancer, among other health benefits. In fact, a spoonful of black-rice bran contains more anthocyanin antioxidants than a spoonful of blueberries…”

“A recent study of mice found that a diet that included 10 percent black-rice bran reduced swelling of inflamed skin, adding fuel to the theory that black rice may also help prevent diseases associated with chronic inflammation, such as diabetes.”

Do you have a favorite recipe that contains black rice?

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