IHA 2017

April 2, 2017 § Leave a comment


The International Home and Housewares show is one of our favorite destinations every March. This show is not just about potato peelers, that is for sure.  There are some fabulous new products presented every year, from kitchen appliances (including glamorous espresso makers), to tabletop, (both elegant and casual), to wellness products, and hundreds of other items.

It is held at McCormick Place in Chicago, one of my favorite venues for its beautifully staged ballroom decorated with plants or floral arrangements and special lighting to reflect the Pantone color of the year.  This year it was decorated with plants, most appropriate to “Greenery.”  There were many of my color friends in the audience, some of whom have not missed a show since I first started to speak there 19 years ago!

Bridget Frizee of Kehoe Design in Chicago, Lee Eiseman, Melissa Bolt

Melissa Bolt, my associate, went with me.  I am forever grateful for the design and imagery she puts together, including the arrangement of the colors that show the origin and direction of the eight color palettes for home that I presented for 2018. Large boards showing the forecasted palettes are also mounted in the Lakeside area of McCormick, each one complete with coordinating products in display cases.

http://www.housewares.org/press/releases/show/430

http://www.housewares.org/press/releases/show/432

We enjoy looking at some of the displays for new products that are also mounted at the show.  This year one of the winners was Nicole Norris, a college student who designed a new ironing board. We certainly do see that as a winning idea!

On the first day for my keynote, I was introduced by Perry Reynolds, Vice President of Marketing and Trade Development, my good buddy, who is retiring and his cheery personality will be sorely missed.  On the second day, I was introduced by Vicky Matranga, another delightful friend, who is Design Programs Coordinator for IHA where she manages the Student Design Competition and the Housewares Design Awards, coordinates displays, and organizes the DesignTheater and design-related events for the annual show.  Vicky is also a collector of housewares items with an attic full of the products that grandma would have thought very high tech in her day (such as waffle irons and steam irons and Waring Blendors (yes, it is spelled with an “o”— a bit of a branding technique in those days.)

Many of you asked where my necklace came from. I recently discovered a local (Seattle) jewelry artist named Melanie Brauner for Verso www.versojewelry.com. What a talent!

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Japan Part Three

February 12, 2017 § Leave a comment


This is the third and final installment on my trip to Asia. The first two stops were in Seoul and then to Shanghai, and the following images were taken on my last stop in Tokyo.

bridge-buildings

When my presentation was finished in Tokyo, my friend and colleague, Maryann Wong from Hong Kong, and I made our way over a bridge to the Shinjuku area to visit Takashimaya, as it had always been one of my favorite stores when they had branches in Los Angeles and New York.

times-square-east

Interestingly, the area around the square in Tokyo was called Times Square—a very different Times Square than the New York location!

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Pictures of flower arrangements on display in front of a department store.

The colors and designs of various flower displays caught my eye immediately as they were so artfully done.

tea-cozies

When we went into the store, we saw some equally colorful displays. I am always drawn to the housewares department. (As you may know, I speak at the International Housewares Show every year.) These tea cozies caught my eye–they certainly could fit into a palette inspired by Pantone’s color of the year—Greenery!

black-floral-dresspink-dress

What truly interested me was the fabric department. It reminded me of the time when there were fabric departments in our stores. Japanese women still enjoy sewing, and these images of traditional kimonos were part of the inspirational display. All of the fabrics were available for sale.

 purse-and-zoris

Displays also showed the usage of fabric on handbags and zoris, the traditional sandal. Color coordination is very important in Japanese design.

gaudion-chair

The furniture department displayed a chair that I could have happily purchased, but the shipping costs are a bit high (and it wouldn’t fit in my suitcase!) Interestingly, the fabric on this chair is right on-trend, not only in its fabulous color story and combination, but in the use of the triangles in the patterning, as well.

The final evening in Tokyo, our hosts took us to yet another fantastic restaurant, one that specializes in blowfish, so that every part of the meal, including appetizer, salad, soup, and main course (although not dessert), featured some sort of blowfish prepared in a different way.

As you might know, blowfish is a delicacy, but certain parts of the fish can be toxic, so they must be handled with care. Obviously, the restaurants are very cautious and they employ specially trained people who know what part to eat (or not). They certainly don’t want to lose their clientele!

As weird as it might sound to eat one specific food prepared in different ways—it was absolutely fabulous. All the prep was done at the table, fascinating to watch and then finally, to eat. It was a fitting end to a truly memorable trip.

Asia Trip 2nd Installment

January 12, 2017 § Leave a comment


This is the second installment in reporting on my recent trip to Asia. The first stop was in Seoul, South Korea, and from there I went to Shanghai, China. It was my second visit to this vast city of more than 14 million people. The view from my 25th floor hotel room revealed many tall buildings,

view-of-tall-building

but interestingly on this visit I noticed that “pocket parks” were popping up—a good thing for adding some oxygen to an environment where the smog reminded me of my early days in Los Angeles (now largely contained.)

Everyone told me that, with my interest in design, the Peace Hotel was a worthy place to visit, and it really was. It is filled with art deco references from the 20s–on the ceilings,

peace-hotel-ceiling

in the bas-reliefs on the walls,

bas-relief-lobby

and in every place the eye landed. There was a reminder of the time period when ladies always dressed glamorously, often changing three times in one day!

The hotel remains a perfect place for shooting films of that period and the lobby contains some of the original posters, including for Empire of the Sun and Shanghai Triad.

It was also a nightspot for dancing, dinner, and an evening of jazz.

jazz-instruments

As I looked around, I did recognize some of the architectural features I have seen of those period films. There was a more recent picture taken on the hotel stairway for Elle Magazine of a very svelte Amanda Seyfried in a gorgeous red gown, very appropriate to the setting.

amanda-seyfried-in-elle

I did have the opportunity to go to a street market that was filled with tiny boutique-like shops. It is always great fun to shop for treasures in these far-way places. But I have to say what I enjoyed most was seeing the displays of clothes for kids as they were fashionable, grown-up, and colorful. Special occasion clothing for kids is very important in Asia.

kids-paris-raincoat

boys-suit

I did another trend presentation in Shanghai and it was another enjoyable experience. It is always fun for me to meet so many “creatives” from other parts of the world and representing a vast variety of color-related industries. The press is always well-represented, and in this audience, among many other press people, there was a team from the Chinese edition of Elle Décor. They were an enthusiastic group and very interested in the use of color.

 

Food is an ongoing feast in Asia and for me, a “pescatarian,” always something to look forward to as there are lots of delectable and healthy choices. More about that in my next installment….

 

David Hockney

July 21, 2016 § Leave a comment


On my way back from London where I was attending color-forecasting meetings, I enjoyed several days in New York where I delivered a seminar at the National Stationery Show. The Big Apple is always full of interesting things to do and see and, on that particular weekend, I noted that a film was being shown at Lincoln Center that I had read about. The subject was David Hockney, the English-born artist, and the film is simply titled: “Hockney”.

Hockney-A Bigger Splash-1967

Hockney has always fascinated me. He arrived in Los Angeles at about the same time I did—in the golden Beach Boys days when the surf was always up and so was the mood of L.A. It was a magical place, filled with sunshine and energy. It was a Technicolor city spread out between orange groves, mountains, and the ever-presence of the blue Pacific,but if sea-and- sand was not readily available, there were the ubiquitous swimming pools.

Hockney managed to capture the feel and look of the area through his many paintings,especially those of swimming pools. He was so enamored of the California lifestyle– “It’s got all the energy of the United States but with the Mediterranean thrown in,” says David Hockney of Southern California in the new feature-length documentary Hockney—and its pools, that he painted a mural on the bottom of the pool at the iconic Roosevelt Hotel in Hollywood—the scene of many parties and photo shoots.

Hockney-Portrait of Nick Wilder-1966

The film I saw at the Lincoln Center was a delight, showing much of Hockney’s wide array of talents. The director of the film, Randall Wright, stated that his mission was to show a “strong sense of place from two very different landscapes– the vast bright spaces of California and the moody hills of East Yorkshire. The creative push and pull of these absolute opposite environments energizes David’s constant search for answers, both creative and personal.“ He also pointed out that “digital cinema is now brilliant for reproducing painting. The color accuracy and the image resolution is breathtaking.
David’s paintings look stunning on the big screen.”
Hockney-California Copied from 1965 Painting in 1987-1987

Indeed they do, and should you have a chance to view this engaging story of an artist and his life and work, it is well worth the time. To whet your appetite, watch the YouTube trailer for the film.

 

YOU’RE (STILL) INVITED!

June 18, 2016 § 2 Comments


 

There are still spots available in Leatrice Eiseman’s next Color/Design course (or what we refer to as “Summer Camp for Color Lovers).

Join us for a 3 1/2–day course taught by the “international color guru, ” color expert Leatrice Eiseman, July 28-31, 2016* on beautiful Bainbridge Island in Washington (a ferry ride from Seattle).  You will learn about color trend forecasting, color psychology, and marketing yourself as a color specialist along with people from around the globe engaged in color.  Establish yourself as a color aficionado in your workplace or industry and learn how to expand your expertise into many facets of color work.

 

Write us at leiseman@nwlink.com for an information packet.

Sharing Bilbao, Spain, and Milan, Italy

May 2, 2016 § Leave a comment


What a fabulous whirlwind of a trip! The first stop was the Guggenheim Museum in Bilbao,

L- Eiseman resized

where I spoke on the Shadows collection and 150 Marilyns work done by the pop artist, Andy Warhol. Although it took much time and research to delve into Warhol’s use of color, especially the influences in his life that led to his color choices, we truly enjoyed the process.

Bilbao Guggenheim Shaddows

My associate, Melissa, and I spent three fabulous days there, staying in a hotel that was just across the avenue from the museum. We girded ourselves with ample breakfasts while looking out at that magnificent Gehry-designed building that literally sparkled in the sunlight.

Guggenheim from Hotel Domine

The architecture and design of the Guggenheim has gathered worldwide attention and it is easy to see why people are so fascinated by the structure.

Guggenheim Bilbao

The collections that we saw were very well curated and it was especially meaningful to see “in person” the works that I was speaking about, having only seen photos prior to our visit. The color usage was phenomenal in the Shadows collection, employing deeper tones such as black, along with orange, peach, yellow, electric blue, lavender, warm reds, hot pink, aubergine, deep green, and vibrant chartreuse. The 150 Marilyns used some of the same vibrant tones against black.

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We allowed enough time to explore the nearby beach town of San Sebastian,

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as well as the old town section of Bilbao that was filled with charming, historically significant architecture—quite a contrast to the contemporary Guggenheim.

Church Old Bilbao

Naturally, we left some time for shopping (colorful shoes are magnets to us!)

Shoes window San Sebastian

and sampling the delicious food. Melissa took some wonderful shots of the green rolling hills (complete with sheep!) surrounding this vibrant city.

Bilbao hillside

Next time, we will share on the blog some of our experiences and images taken while in Milan where we attended Salone de Mobile, the annual furniture fair.

10 Ways Color Affects Your Mood #TBT

April 28, 2016 § 1 Comment


We have a repository of information about a color. For example, the color blue is almost always associated with blue skies, which when we are children is a positive thing — it means playing outside and fun. Evolutionarily it also means there are no storms to come. This is why it is reminds us of stability and calm.

bluesky

Can the color you wear change your mood? Yes! Read on for 10 ways color affects your mood both at home and work.

Source: 10 Ways Color Affects Your Mood | Science Of People

#TBT 2012 Tangerine Tango

April 21, 2016 § Leave a comment


Leatrice Eiseman of the Pantone Color Institute – The New York Times

For the last 12 years, Leatrice Eiseman, executive director of the Pantone Color Institute, has headed the committee that chooses Pantone’s color of the year.

Source: Q&A — Leatrice Eiseman of the Pantone Color Institute – The New York Times

Color And Emotion And Andy Warhol

April 5, 2016 § Leave a comment


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COLOR AND EMOTION:

A PERSPECTIVE ON WARHOL

Several months ago, I received an email from one of the curators of the Guggenheim Museum in Bilbao, Spain.  They had seen the work I had written for the Agnes Martin* exhibit at the Tate Modern in London and wondered if I could do a presentation in Bilbao. It took me all of a half minute to make up my mind, as I have long wanted to visit the Guggenheim in that location. So I said yes before I even knew the subject!

It turns out that the subject I was asked to address is Andy Warhol, the pop artist icon of the 1950s-1980s, as the Guggenheim is currently showing two of Andy’s most ambitious works: Shadows

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and One Hundred and Fifty Multicolored Marilyns.

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One of the most enjoyable things about doing presentations is collecting the research that is such as important part of the talk. I had done some research on Warhol for one of my books, The 20th Century in Color, and had some preliminary information to start with.  Of course, Warhol is all about color and that made it especially interesting to me.

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I turned to one of my favorite art historians, Sister Wendy Beckett.  In her book: 1,000 Masterpieces, 1999, DK Publishing, New York, there is an overview on Andy Warhol’s work that is titled the Marilyn Diptych — a colorful study of the actress, Marilyn Monroe, who is also the subject of one of the collections mentioned above:  One Hundred and Fifty Multicolored Marilyns.  Sister Wendy said of Warhol:  “He was interested in what might be described as contemporary vulgarities.  He loved glamour and fame…

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…here was a subject for Warhol and he treated her with profundity.”  Sister Wendy suggested that his use of vibrant colors on half of the images signified Marilyn’s life and the removal of color in the other half signified her death.  By using Marilyn’s image repeatedly, he “acknowledged his fascination with a society in which personas could be manufactured, commodified, and consumed like products.”

The color palette used for the grounds of the Shadows includes more than a dozen different hues, certain colors that are characteristic of his larger body of work, including violet, aqua, chartreuse, apricot, hot pink, and black.  To quote from the Guggenheim’s press release on the collections:  “Unlike the surfaces of earlier paintings, in which thin layers of rolled acrylic paint constituted the backgrounds onto which black pixelated images were silkscreened, the backgrounds of the Shadows canvases were painted with a sponge mop.  Seven or eight different screens were used to create Shadows, as evidenced in the slight shifts in scales of dark areas as well as the arbitrary presence of spots of light.”

As always, there is much to learn about observing the use of color in different mediums and Warhol’s work certainly is an example of a most prolific career. Check out the images that are posted on this blog and you will get a glimpse of his versatility and depth.  His work is certainly not just about Campbell’s Soup cans!

We worked out the date for the visit to Bilbao so that it dovetails with our trip to Salone de Mobilier in Milan, a destination for us every year to that fabulous furniture fair. My associate, Melissa Bolt, is going with me and she will be taking lots of images of the museum and the surrounding areas that we will be sharing with you in a future blog posting.

*See archives Eiseman Color Blog Aug. 15, 2015

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Leatrice Eiseman, executive director of the internationally famous Pantone Color Institute, will offer a different look at Andy Warhol’s work, particularly his works Shadows and One Hundred and Fifty Multicolored Marilyns, and his peculiar way of using colors. An expert in color psychology, Eiseman will talk about the emotional perception of color from the perspective of culture and association.

Venue: Museum Auditorium

Date and time: Monday, April 11, 6:30 pm

Free tickets available at the admission desk and on the website

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Countdown To California Color/Design Class 2016

January 18, 2016 § Leave a comment


There is still time to secure your spot in the January 2016 Color/Design Class in Burbank, CA.

Please email us at Leiseman@nwlink.com for more information.

 

 

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