Japan Part Three

February 12, 2017 § Leave a comment


This is the third and final installment on my trip to Asia. The first two stops were in Seoul and then to Shanghai, and the following images were taken on my last stop in Tokyo.

bridge-buildings

When my presentation was finished in Tokyo, my friend and colleague, Maryann Wong from Hong Kong, and I made our way over a bridge to the Shinjuku area to visit Takashimaya, as it had always been one of my favorite stores when they had branches in Los Angeles and New York.

times-square-east

Interestingly, the area around the square in Tokyo was called Times Square—a very different Times Square than the New York location!

white-floralfloral-arrangement

Pictures of flower arrangements on display in front of a department store.

The colors and designs of various flower displays caught my eye immediately as they were so artfully done.

tea-cozies

When we went into the store, we saw some equally colorful displays. I am always drawn to the housewares department. (As you may know, I speak at the International Housewares Show every year.) These tea cozies caught my eye–they certainly could fit into a palette inspired by Pantone’s color of the year—Greenery!

black-floral-dresspink-dress

What truly interested me was the fabric department. It reminded me of the time when there were fabric departments in our stores. Japanese women still enjoy sewing, and these images of traditional kimonos were part of the inspirational display. All of the fabrics were available for sale.

 purse-and-zoris

Displays also showed the usage of fabric on handbags and zoris, the traditional sandal. Color coordination is very important in Japanese design.

gaudion-chair

The furniture department displayed a chair that I could have happily purchased, but the shipping costs are a bit high (and it wouldn’t fit in my suitcase!) Interestingly, the fabric on this chair is right on-trend, not only in its fabulous color story and combination, but in the use of the triangles in the patterning, as well.

The final evening in Tokyo, our hosts took us to yet another fantastic restaurant, one that specializes in blowfish, so that every part of the meal, including appetizer, salad, soup, and main course (although not dessert), featured some sort of blowfish prepared in a different way.

As you might know, blowfish is a delicacy, but certain parts of the fish can be toxic, so they must be handled with care. Obviously, the restaurants are very cautious and they employ specially trained people who know what part to eat (or not). They certainly don’t want to lose their clientele!

As weird as it might sound to eat one specific food prepared in different ways—it was absolutely fabulous. All the prep was done at the table, fascinating to watch and then finally, to eat. It was a fitting end to a truly memorable trip.

Yves St. Laurent

December 4, 2016 § Leave a comment


Ever since attending his first museum collection in New York, I have always been a big fan of Yves St. Laurent. I have found his work to be incredibly imaginative, skillfully designed and colorful. When my associate, Melissa Bolt, told me that a collection of his work was being shown at the Seattle Art Museum, we decided it was a “must-see” and it was!

ysl-camel-suit

The newsletter published by SAM, as the museum is affectionately called, said that the St. Laurent collection “filled the gallery with elegance.” The collection is called: The Perfection of Style and described as following “the revolutionary concepts of this fashion icon whose designs shifted perceptions of gender and class.”

ysl-striped-top

On display were his paper dolls modeling his early fashion designs. These morphed into his sketches shown with original fabric samples of the110 garments, featured along with accessories, each of them so contemporary looking (and in such good condition) that they could be worn on the fashion runways today.

ysl-pink-sleeve

After we saw the collection, I was inspired to look for a book called simply “Yves St. Laurent” that I had purchased at the Met in NY and found it in my collection. Some of the clothing that was in the book was featured in the show, so we had the chance to revisit them.

ysl-mod-suede

Diana Vreeland, the flamboyant lover of red who was the special consultant to the Costume Institute at the Met, wrote an introduction to the book, stating that St. Laurent was “followed across the oceans of the world by women who look young, live young and are young, no matter what their age. That works for me!!

ysl-red

The collection will be at SAM until January 17. 2017.

http://ysl.site.seattleartmuseum.org

 

 

 

 

Maison & Objet

October 9, 2016 § 2 Comments


paris-cardboard-scend

My associate and fellow color enthusiast, Melissa Bolt, and I had the pleasure of attending the fabulous home furnishing show, Maison&Objet, in Paris last month.

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That city with all its design influences hosts a show that is a feast for the eyes.

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chairs-rainbow

There are eight stadium-sized halls, all inter-connected and filled with everything from housewares, textiles, furniture, and tabletop, to lighting, carpeting, giftware, and home accessories.

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jim-morrison

floral-bench

dogs-w-scarves

fabric-colors

dusky-dishes

wire-swirl-baskets

turquoise-and-orange-pillows

peppermills

There is an area we especially look forward to visiting called Atelier that offers the most original and colorful wares, including wearable art and jewelry. Another area that we love is a special section devoted to young artists and artisans, many of whom are just starting in business.  It is more than trés jolie.

relais-odeon

Of course, being in Paris also means eating great food, visiting interesting areas of the city, conversing with the people, and we manage to squeeze in a bit of shopping!

chocolat

very-old-street-in-the-odeon

man-in-purple

paris-flag-purse

We decided to share some of the two thousand images that Melissa takes during the show and on the streets of this amazing city that ultimately can influence the forecasts that we develop for Pantone. There are many other factors and trade shows that can influence trend forecasts, however, what we see in Paris is a major and treasured source of information and inspiration

Stettheimer And More: Pt 2

September 25, 2016 § Leave a comment


I had such fun researching (as well as discovering) more of Florine Stettheimer’s work that I wanted to share more of it.  Interestingly, the Portland, Maine Museum of Art just completed a show of her work in tandem with three other female artists of Florine’s same time period who used color in intriguing combinations. The best known artist, who was also a personal friend to Florine, was Georgia O”Keefe, a name familiar to those who are color lovers.

 

O’Keeffe, Stettheimer, Torr, Zorach: Women Modernists in New York examines the art and careers of four pioneering artists and their contributions to American modernism in parallel for the first time. Through this exhibition, the PMA invites visitors to explore works by some of the most significant modernists in American art history: Georgia O’Keeffe, Marguerite Thompson Zorach, Florine Stettheimer, and Helen Torr.

Florine Stettheimer, American artist, in her Bryant Park garden.

Florine Stettheimer, American artist, in her Bryant Park garden.

Source: O’Keeffe, Stettheimer, Torr, Zorach | Portland Museum of Art

David Hockney

July 21, 2016 § Leave a comment


On my way back from London where I was attending color-forecasting meetings, I enjoyed several days in New York where I delivered a seminar at the National Stationery Show. The Big Apple is always full of interesting things to do and see and, on that particular weekend, I noted that a film was being shown at Lincoln Center that I had read about. The subject was David Hockney, the English-born artist, and the film is simply titled: “Hockney”.

Hockney-A Bigger Splash-1967

Hockney has always fascinated me. He arrived in Los Angeles at about the same time I did—in the golden Beach Boys days when the surf was always up and so was the mood of L.A. It was a magical place, filled with sunshine and energy. It was a Technicolor city spread out between orange groves, mountains, and the ever-presence of the blue Pacific,but if sea-and- sand was not readily available, there were the ubiquitous swimming pools.

Hockney managed to capture the feel and look of the area through his many paintings,especially those of swimming pools. He was so enamored of the California lifestyle– “It’s got all the energy of the United States but with the Mediterranean thrown in,” says David Hockney of Southern California in the new feature-length documentary Hockney—and its pools, that he painted a mural on the bottom of the pool at the iconic Roosevelt Hotel in Hollywood—the scene of many parties and photo shoots.

Hockney-Portrait of Nick Wilder-1966

The film I saw at the Lincoln Center was a delight, showing much of Hockney’s wide array of talents. The director of the film, Randall Wright, stated that his mission was to show a “strong sense of place from two very different landscapes– the vast bright spaces of California and the moody hills of East Yorkshire. The creative push and pull of these absolute opposite environments energizes David’s constant search for answers, both creative and personal.“ He also pointed out that “digital cinema is now brilliant for reproducing painting. The color accuracy and the image resolution is breathtaking.
David’s paintings look stunning on the big screen.”
Hockney-California Copied from 1965 Painting in 1987-1987

Indeed they do, and should you have a chance to view this engaging story of an artist and his life and work, it is well worth the time. To whet your appetite, watch the YouTube trailer for the film.

 

YOU’RE (STILL) INVITED!

June 18, 2016 § 2 Comments


 

There are still spots available in Leatrice Eiseman’s next Color/Design course (or what we refer to as “Summer Camp for Color Lovers).

Join us for a 3 1/2–day course taught by the “international color guru, ” color expert Leatrice Eiseman, July 28-31, 2016* on beautiful Bainbridge Island in Washington (a ferry ride from Seattle).  You will learn about color trend forecasting, color psychology, and marketing yourself as a color specialist along with people from around the globe engaged in color.  Establish yourself as a color aficionado in your workplace or industry and learn how to expand your expertise into many facets of color work.

 

Write us at leiseman@nwlink.com for an information packet.

Milan

May 23, 2016 § Leave a comment


Every April, my associate Melissa Bolt, and I have the pleasure of visiting one of our favorite cities—Milan. We attend the Salone del Mobile for the purpose of seeing the latest trends and innovations in the world of furniture, although this enormous gathering of fabulous goods gives us much insight into other areas of design as well. This is Italy, after all, where every facet of home furnishings is explored and relished.

Wood look oven and stovetop Wood block with seat

We stay with our good friend, Grazia Billio, a gifted colorist who also happens to be the VP and one of the founders of Color Coloris,

Logo-Color-Coloris2

an organization that brings together color experts from many industries, and presents a day-long color experience every year in November (http://www.colorcoloris.com/en_index.htm). I met Grazia through another dear friend, colleague, and multi-talented designer, Vittorio Giomo. Vittorio is the very colorful President of Color Coloris.

Grazia’s charming home is in the heart of the Brera district, the design center of Milan. Every year, the Brera bursts with activity and creative output as designers from all over the world who attend the Salone also find their way to the Brera. Grazia guides us through the hordes of people all anxious to see what’s new in design.

COY vases in window Milan

(Of course, along the way are the foods and flavors that Italy is known for.) It always amazes us that so many people have the energy to trudge the fair and then party into the wee hours, but everyone is exhilarated by the intimate connection to both design and color.

We also visited La Triennale di Milano, a design museum in Milan where Melissa could photograph even more images that would enable us to remember all that we see while visiting the area.

View from Triannale

White ceiling treatment

Red living room Triannale

Just to give you a flavor of the Salone, the Brera, and the Triannale, we are sharing a few of the 1,800 photos with you. May be this will whet your appetite for your own visit to Milan…

DSCF3770

DSCF3384

DSCF3199

Closet

Design student necklace

Design student light

Ceiling acoustic treatment

Jeans pile Jeans n tees chair

Fluorescent shelf and mirror Floral arrangement

Wolf chair

Ciao……..

10 Ways Color Affects Your Mood #TBT

April 28, 2016 § 1 Comment


We have a repository of information about a color. For example, the color blue is almost always associated with blue skies, which when we are children is a positive thing — it means playing outside and fun. Evolutionarily it also means there are no storms to come. This is why it is reminds us of stability and calm.

bluesky

Can the color you wear change your mood? Yes! Read on for 10 ways color affects your mood both at home and work.

Source: 10 Ways Color Affects Your Mood | Science Of People

Color Color Color Color Color Chameleon

October 26, 2015 § 1 Comment


October 26, 2015

 

One of my students recently asked me how it is that someone is able to pull off different Colortimes®. (Colortime® refers to my system for determining one’s best personal image colors based on hair color, eye color, and skin tone.) Here is my answer:

Anyone who has constant access to professional stylists or the money and time to constantly change their “look” could probably dress in any Colortime® they choose, depending on a whim or their mood. This is why you see someone like Olivia Wilde looking so different in many photos.

Screen Shot 2015-10-14 at 9.45.40 AM

Julianne Moore is another excellent example of how her looks are changed for various photo shoots.   If she chooses to wear an emerald green dress to an awards dinner, her makeup artist will likely use on her a very fair, cool tone foundation and play up the green in her eyes.  Her stylists know how to advise on all of this—that’s why she always looks so good.

Screen Shot 2015-10-26 at 5.14.21 AM

Celebrities also have the benefit of being under flattering lighting be it for TV, film, stage, or photo shoots where flaws can be corrected, and these “tricks of the trade” are always available to them. There are also the “fashionistas” and “creatives” who enjoy changing their looks from day to day—they really embrace the process.

However, there is the reality of the woman or man who has little time, a limited budget, or just doesn’t have the know-how to make calculated style changes. He wants to know that all his ties go with his suits. She wants to reach into her makeup drawer and pull out cosmetics that work for her coloring.  This is where starting out in a basic Colortime® makes so much sense. Many of us want a method that is reliable, a color palette that will look good and be so well coordinated that it doesn’t take much time or money to feel confident. A Colortime® consultant teaches the basics of the theory and demonstrates its practical application.

What is your best chameleon moment?

 

 

 

Kartell à la Mode

September 24, 2015 § Leave a comment


September 24, 2015

Kartell is an Italian company that makes and sells plastic contemporary furniture. Headquartered in Milan, they began manufacturing automobile accessories in 1949 and expanded into contract and home furnishings in 1963. 

 

They have now forged an interesting partnership with one of the most imaginative fashion designers with a long-standing reputation in the use of unique color and pattern combinations. Christian LaCroix became the darling of the fashion runways in the 80s, but the 90s and early 2000s saw a decline in both business and attention. However, in recent years, we have seen his name on the ascendancy again, this time combining with “Kartell à la Mode,” as it is being called, in creating and producing a new handbag line.

Kartell-Lacroix-nera

Available in two sizes, a tote and a clutch bag, the fabrication is injection-molded plastic, a material that Kartell is referring to as “rich and sensual,” certainly not the usual connotation and impression of plastic. The shapes are geometric in design and both styles will be available in five colors, although those five colors have not been named yet.

 

Kartell has a recent history of producing some other intriguing, industrial–inspired molded plastic in inventive fashion forward looks and, very recently, they partnered with No.21, a Milanese shoe manufacturer. Called “The Knot,” the provocative and intricate styling on the sandal is quite unique, one that takes special skills to make. It is available in five colors: black, powder pink, mustard yellow, khaki green, and burgundy.

Knot_N21_cipria_side

The look of the shoes fits very well into the influences we saw recently in Paris. Stilettos have given way to much lower heels, with sneakers being the “shoe du jour” in every imaginable color, pattern and, most often, with sparkle.

Knot_N21

Question: What do you think of the color range of the Knot? Would you wear this kind of shoe?

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