Japan Part Three

February 12, 2017 § Leave a comment


This is the third and final installment on my trip to Asia. The first two stops were in Seoul and then to Shanghai, and the following images were taken on my last stop in Tokyo.

bridge-buildings

When my presentation was finished in Tokyo, my friend and colleague, Maryann Wong from Hong Kong, and I made our way over a bridge to the Shinjuku area to visit Takashimaya, as it had always been one of my favorite stores when they had branches in Los Angeles and New York.

times-square-east

Interestingly, the area around the square in Tokyo was called Times Square—a very different Times Square than the New York location!

white-floralfloral-arrangement

Pictures of flower arrangements on display in front of a department store.

The colors and designs of various flower displays caught my eye immediately as they were so artfully done.

tea-cozies

When we went into the store, we saw some equally colorful displays. I am always drawn to the housewares department. (As you may know, I speak at the International Housewares Show every year.) These tea cozies caught my eye–they certainly could fit into a palette inspired by Pantone’s color of the year—Greenery!

black-floral-dresspink-dress

What truly interested me was the fabric department. It reminded me of the time when there were fabric departments in our stores. Japanese women still enjoy sewing, and these images of traditional kimonos were part of the inspirational display. All of the fabrics were available for sale.

 purse-and-zoris

Displays also showed the usage of fabric on handbags and zoris, the traditional sandal. Color coordination is very important in Japanese design.

gaudion-chair

The furniture department displayed a chair that I could have happily purchased, but the shipping costs are a bit high (and it wouldn’t fit in my suitcase!) Interestingly, the fabric on this chair is right on-trend, not only in its fabulous color story and combination, but in the use of the triangles in the patterning, as well.

The final evening in Tokyo, our hosts took us to yet another fantastic restaurant, one that specializes in blowfish, so that every part of the meal, including appetizer, salad, soup, and main course (although not dessert), featured some sort of blowfish prepared in a different way.

As you might know, blowfish is a delicacy, but certain parts of the fish can be toxic, so they must be handled with care. Obviously, the restaurants are very cautious and they employ specially trained people who know what part to eat (or not). They certainly don’t want to lose their clientele!

As weird as it might sound to eat one specific food prepared in different ways—it was absolutely fabulous. All the prep was done at the table, fascinating to watch and then finally, to eat. It was a fitting end to a truly memorable trip.

Africa By Way Of Dubai

August 22, 2012 § 1 Comment


August 22, 2012

I arrived safe and sound in South Africa after spending an overnight layover in Dubai where it was 106 when I landed and 111 the next morning!

It was a mass of humanity in Dubai, with everyone celebrating the end of the Muslim holiday of Ramadan. It seemed that every person in Dubai was out that night. I was told to go to the Dubai mall to see the dancing waters and because it has the best air conditioning. I also saw the tallest building in the world (Burj Khalifa) that is located in Dubai. Personally, I think the waters at the Bellagio in Las Vegas are more spectacular, but the Burj Khalifa building was astounding.

Please note that these are not my pictures. My pictures did not do these beauties justice.

Next time I will have to bring Herb as he is the resident photographer.

Image via

They are very big on shopping there. At the Dubai Mall, they have all of the big designer names in a specific wing, but just like everywhere else, the western-ized shops and restaurants are a big deal. A Pottery Barn and Sephora were the first things I noticed, and directly across from the Burj Khalifa building is a California Pizza Kitchen, P.F Changs, and a place selling bagels!! That was unexpected, to be sure.



In traditional restaurants, the food was excellent – very middle-eastern in feeling with lots of different kinds of hummus, tabouleh and stuffed grape leaves and many veggie options – my kind of thing.

Once I landed in Durban I had drinks with my friend, Anne Roselt, Design Director for Plascon Paints and a former student of my Burbank Color/Design class. You can see more of her fabulous color trends on my Facebook page or you can check them out HERE.

I had a room with a small balcony that faced the ocean – amazing. I took a quick walk along the beach in the morning to get ready for the day. We then went to rehearsal and did some other media interviews before my presentation on Tuesday. Then we were off to Joberg and Cape Town. 

It was so wonderful to be back in South Africa. My hosts were incredibly gracious and thoughtful.

 

Eating A Fruit And Vegetable Rainbow Makes For A Rosy Glow

March 14, 2012 § Leave a comment


March 14, 2012

One question I get asked a lot is “Can the color of fruit and vegetables be an indicator of their healing powers?”

I have answered this and many more color questions in my Color Answer Book. Below is my response to this question and an excerpt from a study that has supporting evidence that further validates the research.

Ongoing research indicates that eating a variety of colorful fruits and vegetables can be extremely beneficial to our optimum health and healing. The color itself is an indicator of its curative powers. For example, eating red and purple fruits has been shown to help prevent heart disease and cancer. There are also non-irritating anti-inflammatory antioxidants in fruits such as cherries, raspberries, strawberries, cranberries, blueberries, blackberries, plums, and grapes. These delicious sources of well-being contain natural dyes called anthocyanins.

 

A new study that came out last week further supports these facts and raises them by stating that “The key to a rosy, healthy-looking complexion may be as simple as eating more fruits and vegetables, researchers say. Within a six-week period, fluctuation in fruit and vegetable consumption was associated with skin-color changes,” said lead researcher Ross Whitehead, from the School of Psychology at the University of St. Andrews in Scotland.


 

Now you know why your mother insisted you eat your fruits and vegetables!

Such A Tart!

January 12, 2012 § 2 Comments


January 12, 2012

Just as there are trends in fashion, technology and color there are also food trends. Whether it be in spices or the development of a new hybrid fruit or vegetable the epicurean world is growing and changing too. I am always intrigued with food trends and studies as I am a conscious consumer and take health and well being very seriously. I have written on the subject of color and food in my book: The Color Answer Book where I answer the question “can the color of fruit and vegetables be an indicator of their healing powers”?

Ongoing research indicates that eating a variety of colorful fruits and vegetables can be extremely beneficial to our optimum health and healing. The color itself is an indicator of its curative powers. For example, eating red and purple fruits has been shown to help prevent heart disease and cancer.

Take a look at what http://www.choosecherries.com/ has to say about cherries.

“Cherries are not only good for you, but they’re also on trend as a homegrown “Super Fruit.” According to recent data, more than 9 out of 10 Americans want to know where their food comes from, nearly 80 percent say they’re purchasing “locally produced” products, and the majority is defining “local” as grown in America. And cherries deliver.

A growing body of science reveals tart cherries, enjoyed as either dried, frozen cherries or cherry juice, have among the highest levels of disease-fighting antioxidants, when compared to other fruits. They also contain other important nutrients such as beta carotene (19 times more than blueberries or strawberries) vitamin C, potassium, magnesium, iron, fiber and folate.

Emerging evidence links cherries to many important health benefits – from helping to ease the pain of arthritis and gout, to reducing risk factors for heart disease, diabetes and certain cancers.”

So as your momma always told you to “eat your veggies”, let’s include the cherries, too.

Trends: Flavor Trends for 2012.

World of Chocolate

November 26, 2011 § Leave a comment


November 26, 2011

Barbara Dufford is one of my former Color/Design students and a gifted graphic designer. Barbara has kept in touch with me over the years. Happily, many of my former students, like Barbara, do keep in touch. She has shared some of her wonderful work with me that I thought worthy of sharing with all of you.

Here is a little more about Barbara (in her own words) and a sample of her current work with the Aids Foundation of Chicago. If you want more information please click the image(s).

 

I’m a communications designer (and 2005 graduate of the Color?Design course) with a wide range of experience with corporate and non-profit clients, especially working with arts and social justice endeavors. I love using design’s power to engage people in support of a cause as worthy as the fight against AIDS. The organizers of this year’s World of Chocolate were interested in highlighting the elegant and sensuous aspects of the event. Both color and texture, visual and tactile, helped accomplish that goal: the slightly transparent red and brown areas overlay a rich background color photo of one of the tables at last year’s event, adding complexity to the color fields. And, the card has a “soft touch” coating which gives a velvety feel to the piece.

Food coloring: Do synthetic food colors cause hyperactivity?

January 3, 2011 § 2 Comments


January 3, 2011



We here at the eiseman color blog are very interested in all things related to color. Over the weekend, we found this story about food coloring that was fascinating. Lee has been sharing the ideas of Ben Feingold with her classes for years.

Years ago I heard that Red dye No5 was the worst (extreme word for effect) thing and it should be avoided at all cost. Then this weekend we picked up a book by Michael Pollen called Food Rules that shares some simple thoughts on food like not eating cereal that turns the milk colors. I like it, simple to understand.


The children will not be pleased with this one. Consider this informative color tidbit food for thought.

Click the link for more.

Food coloring: Do synthetic food colors cause hyperactivity? – chicagotribune.com.

Black Is The New Brown

December 27, 2010 § Leave a comment


December 27, 2010

For those of you who know me, you know that I am a devout pescatarian-no meat eater. Veggies, lentils, fungi, fruit, multigrain, fish, no sugar and non-fat (except for the good fat) diet.  I am always looking for healthy tips, especially those involving color, so when Whole Living magazine published and article claiming that Black is the New Brown, my ears and eyes, perked up!—Lee

Louisiana State University researchers have found that “Black rice may unseat brown as the healthiest option”.


“Like brown rice, black rice has an outer layer of antioxidant-rich bran, which has been shown to help lower cholesterol. Unlike the bran found in brown rice, however, black-rice bran contains anthocyanins, the purple and reddish pigments also found in blueberries, grapes, and acai. These compounds decrease the risk of heart disease and cancer, among other health benefits. In fact, a spoonful of black-rice bran contains more anthocyanin antioxidants than a spoonful of blueberries…”

“A recent study of mice found that a diet that included 10 percent black-rice bran reduced swelling of inflamed skin, adding fuel to the theory that black rice may also help prevent diseases associated with chronic inflammation, such as diabetes.”

Do you have a favorite recipe that contains black rice?

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